UPDATE: HR459 – 274 Cosponsors

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HR459 cosponsors – Federal Reserve Transparency Act of 2011

Updated 7/19/2012 – 274 Cosponsors

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A rare Fed dissent from three regional presidents

The Federal Reserve has kept its short-term interest-rate target at near-zero for 32 months, and yesterday its Open Market Committee announced that it’ll keep the rate there for at least another 24 months. This is what a central bank does when it wants to appear to do something to help the economy but has already fired most of its ammunition.

The announcement of a specific mid-2013 target date supplants language that near-zero rates would continue for an “extended period.” The idea is to assure markets that the Fed won’t tighten for a very long time. Investors who want higher returns will have to go further out on the risk curve for longer, and so perhaps this will keep long rates lower for longer. Equities—one form of risky asset—certainly reacted well yesterday.

Read more here.

The Federal Reserve has kept its short-term interest-rate target at near-zero for 32 months, and yesterday its Open Market Committee announced that it’ll keep the rate there for at least another 24 months. This is what a central bank does when it wants to appear to do something to help the economy but has already fired most of its ammunition.

The announcement of a specific mid-2013 target date supplants language that near-zero rates would continue for an “extended period.” The idea is to assure markets that the Fed won’t tighten for a very long time. Investors who want higher returns will have to go further out on the risk curve for longer, and so perhaps this will keep long rates lower for longer. Equities—one form of risky asset—certainly reacted well yesterday.

A Short History of US Credit Defaults

Mises Daily: Friday, July 15, 2011 by

On July 13th, the president of the United States angrily walked out of ongoing negotiations over the raising of the debt ceiling from its legislated maximum of $14.294 trillion dollars. This prompted a new round of speculation over whether the United States might default on its financial obligations. In these circumstances, it is useful to recall the previous instances in which this has occurred and the effects of those defaults. By studying the defaults of the past, we can gain insights into what future defaults might portend.

 

Read more: http://mises.org/daily/5463/A-Short-History-of-US-Credit-D%20efaults

When a cut is not a cut

When a cut is not a cut

By Rep. Ron Paul (R-Texas) – 08/01/11 12:15 PM ET

One might think that the recent drama over the debt ceiling involves one side wanting to increase or maintain spending with the other side wanting to drastically cut spending, but that is far from the truth.  In spite of the rhetoric being thrown around, the real debate is over how much government spending will increase.

No plan under serious consideration cuts spending in the way you and I think about it.  Instead, the “cuts” being discussed are illusory, and are not cuts from current amounts being spent, but cuts in projected spending increases.  This is akin to a family “saving” $100,000 in expenses by deciding not to buy a Lamborghini, and instead getting a fully loaded Mercedes, when really their budget dictates that they need to stick with their perfectly serviceable Honda.  But this is the type of math Washington uses to mask the incriminating truth about their unrepentant plundering of the American people.

 

Continue reading here.

Ron Paul the Master

This Is Why We Need Ron Paul 2012

Ron Paul: It’s All a Fraud – Boehner’s “Cuts” Are Fictitious